Archives for posts with tag: tree mapping

Last summer, our Citizen Pruners conducted an inventory of over a thousand trees within two blocks of the Gowanus Canal. Over the past few months, our partners at TreeKIT organized the data collected to map these trees, and we’d like to share their work with everyone.

Street Tree Species mapped (click to enlarge):

table

Screenshots of Tree Inventory on www.treekit.org/map (click to enlarge):

a) North: In this image we see what the inventory looks like around the northern portion of the Canal. Note that there are many street trees on lower-density residential streets -- but none on a public housing super-block nearby.

a) North: In this image we see what the inventory looks like around the northern portion of the Canal. Note that there are many street trees on lower-density residential streets — but none on a public housing super-block nearby.

b) Southwest: In this image we see what the inventory looks like around the Southwestern portion of the Canal. We were pleased to find so many trees growing in the predominately residential portion of this area. Note that many residential blocks do not have street trees.

b) Southwest: In this image we see what the inventory looks like around the Southwestern portion of the Canal. We were pleased to find so many trees growing in the predominately residential portion of this area. Note that many residential blocks do not have street trees.

c) Southeast: In this image, we see what the inventory looks like around the Southeastern portion of the Canal. As in the southwest, we found many trees growing on residential blocks, but few in the industrial areas.

c) Southeast: In this image, we see what the inventory looks like around the Southeastern portion of the Canal. As in the southwest, we found many trees growing on residential blocks, but few in the industrial areas.

Complete Tree inventory.

Complete Tree inventory.

To download the Excel file of our Tree Inventory, please click here:
T304833 Gowanus Tree Inventory with Key and LatLong_150527.

This project was funded by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Environmental Protection Fund.

Advertisements

Back in February we posted about a project that aimed to map all tree pits within 2 blocks of the canal with the aid of TreeKIT, one of our partners. After reviewing the planning phase detailed in the previous blog post, we were all set to go through with the project.

Through TreesNY’s Citizen Pruner Program, 15 volunteers were trained for the purposes of this project. The Citizen Pruner Program, as described in its website, taught volunteers about “tree biology, street tree identification, common tree problems, tree stewardship, and how to prune dead and damaged limbs.”

The ultimate goal of the tree mapping project was to conduct an inventory of all existing street trees and empty tree pits within approximately 2 blocks of the Gowanus Canal, and with the help of TreeKIT, format and manage the street tree mapping data for public use as well as the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation (DPR). This information will help identify potential tree planting sites in addition to preparing a Tree Management Plan; the Conservancy hopes to engage more volunteers in the Gowanus community to steward local trees. The Management Plan would include a mobile platform where volunteers can log their stewardship activity.

In order to collect the data, the 15 volunteers who underwent the Citizen Pruning Program were designated as ‘Mapping Stewards’ and led volunteers around the proposed mapping site to collect the data.

Screen Shot 2013-11-01 at 3.33.14 PM

The zones seen here served as guidelines for which areas the Mapping Stewards and their fellow mappers covered.

The Tree Mapping event was a great success – see the finished map on TreeKIT’s website! You can zoom in to individual trees to view details such as species, DBH (diameter at breast height), and its health.

Among the data collected are the following:

  • Out of the 294 block segments mapped, 113 had no trees, or 38.4% of block segments
  • Total amount of living trees: 1009
  • Total standing dead trees: 12
  • Total stumps: 22
  • Total number of tree beds: 1093
  • Total empty tree beds: 50
  • Median tree diameter DBH: 6.0″
  • Biggest tree DBH: 38.2″
  • Living trees with genus and species unknown: 11

Finally, check out some of these pictures of the data collection process in action!

Discussing the data gathered.

Tree mappers on the move!

Measuring the DBH.

We would like to thank our partners at TreeKIT and TreesNY for collaborating with us on this project. We also want to thank all of our Mapping Stewards and volunteers for assisting us! None of this could have been possible without all of you.

Over 60 volunteers joined us this weekend for our monthly volunteer day; we had guests from all over the city, tri-state area, and even from Massachusetts! This Clean & Green was especially exciting for the Conservancy as we hosted a special event: a community mural installation! In addition to the mural, volunteers also helped the Conservancy do some tree stewardship and tree mapping.

A big thanks goes out to Tonci Antunovic for his amazing photos (on our Flickr and on this blog post)! Though the day was packed with a lot of activities, it was a huge success due to the time and effort given by volunteer groups from NYCares, Whole Foods, and everyone else who spent their Saturday with us!

Tree Stewardship and Mapping
With our volunteers, we were able to clean and weed 15 trees, mulch 8 tree beds, and pull about 260 pounds of weeds and unwanted species. This goes a long way in helping keep our trees healthy!

Our Mapping Stewards finished up the southwest and southeast portions of the Forestry Study Area. We are currently 95% finished mapping, thanks to the hard work of all of our tree mappers! Look out for more details regarding when the TreeKIT map will be online for public viewing.

IMG_4604IMG_4613 (1)6_23_13_CandGpictures-47
Mural Installation
The Conservancy installed a mural depicting fruits and vegetables along Huntington Street.  It was designed by a volunteer artist, Ruth Hofheimer, and is meant to be a humorous contrast to its location within such an industrial neighborhood and alongside the Canal. A big thanks goes out to Build It Green!NYC for donating 20 gallons of exterior primer, Home Depot for contributing brushes, rollers, trays and 10 gallons of exterior paint, and to all those who made financial contributions to the project.  Here are some photos taken throughout the day:IMG_4630IMG_4828IMG_4821 (1)IMG_4735IMG_4723 (1)IMG_4739
And a shot of the finished product! 20130727_155149
There are plenty of pictures, so please check them out on our Flickr!
Also, don’t forget to take a look at these awesome articles about the mural from NY1 and The Brooklyn Paper!

After a long summer day, there’s nothing better than a good grill sesh, with food graciously given to us by Whole Foods. Thanks again to everyone who came on Saturday and we hope to see you at our next Clean & Green in August!

Yesterday, the Conservancy welcomed about 80 volunteers to the Salt Lot for our monthly Clean & Green event, our most yet! Volunteers participated in compost windrow building, tree mapping, tree stewardship, and a green wall workshop. We also had a group of volunteers do some stewardship work with the Gowanus Alliance at Ennis Park. There were many activities going on so thank you to our volunteers from NYCares, Whole Foods and the community for all your help!

Compost
With about 7500 lbs of food scraps, we created our June Compost Windrow! Here’s some pictures of our volunteers working hard adding layers and sculpting our new pile.
20130623_131955

Untitled
We also sifted around a cubic yard of compost with a compost sifter from DB Co-op, an organization of engineers, designers, architects, and more who create human powered machines. When someone pedals the bike, the attached mesh drum turns and sifts the compost. Who doesn’t love the idea of working out while composting? Here’s one of our enthusiastic volunteers pedaling away:
Untitled
Tree Stewardship
While we did some stewardship and mapping around the Salt Lot, we also sent volunteers over to Ennis Park to help the Gowanus Alliance with their work. We pruned some bushes and picked up nearby trash.

20130623_115903 20130623_120903

Then, we enjoyed some delicious food and even received shirts courtesy of the Gowanus Alliance. Thanks to them for organizing such a fun activity for us!

20130623_125926

Green Wall Workshop
Members of our volunteer committee came up with the great idea to create green wall prototypes for the Salt Lot, furthering the Conservancy’s efforts to green more urban space. The green wall was made of readily available materials and shows that a project like this is not difficult to pull off. Volunteers helped construct, plant, and install these prototypes along the fence of the Salt Lot. A big thanks to Build It Green for providing some of our materials.

Here are some pictures of the process of creating one of these prototypes: 20130623_13291920130623_132120
Here’s two of our garden interns, Pamela and Jeanette, working on it:
Untitled
And the finished project!Untitled
These prototypes are a beautiful new addition to the Salt Lot and we’re excited to see their progress!

And after a long hot day in the sun, we ended the day with a barbecue feast courtesy of Whole Foods.
Untitled
Thanks again to everyone who came yesterday and we hope to see you soon! For more pictures, check out our Flickr!

This summer, we’re excited to start a new project geared towards tree enthusiasts: the NY Department of Environmental Conservation awarded the Conservancy a grant to map all tree pits within 2 blocks of the canal. With this information, we hope to expand green space around the canal, one of the most sparsely forested areas in Brooklyn. We also plan to present the information gathered to the public in August.

Gowanus Forestry Study Area:

To gather data, TreeKIT has developed simple site-surveying methods for geolocating street trees. They aim to map all the tree pits in NYC, which will include the data that we gather. Data such as tree pit size, diameter at breast height (DBH), tree identification, and relative health of the tree will help us better understand the scope of the Gowanus urban forest.

, they rock.

To kickstart this project, we hosted a meeting for many of our Mapping Stewards this past Thursday–the Conservancy is lucky to host such an enthusiastic group of folks to lead this venture. We came out of the meeting ready to tackle tree pits with a clipboard and a measuring wheel (as shown below):

Mapping Stewards will get trained as Citizen Pruners, as well as TreeKIT data collection; they’ll then lead volunteers on four Mapping Days.

Keep your eyes peeled for tree mapping action this summer!

If you are interested in volunteering, email natasia@gowanuscanalconservancy.org. Additionally, more information on getting licensed as a Citizen Pruner can be found on the TreesNY website.